The Gospel According to Doctor Who
Another excellent review: DOCTOR WHO 8×02 – “Into the Dalek” | The Unaffiliated Critic
" Doctor Who is not about being wholly good: it’s about choosing the good side over the bad side, deciding to do the hard right thing over the easy wrong thing, choosing to be a doctor and not a Dalek."

Another excellent review: DOCTOR WHO 8×02 – “Into the Dalek” | The Unaffiliated Critic

" Doctor Who is not about being wholly good: it’s about choosing the good side over the bad side, deciding to do the hard right thing over the easy wrong thing, choosing to be a doctor and not a Dalek."

Impossible things happen and we call them miracles. Clara is the impossible girl. Believe.

VASTRA: But he is The Doctor. He has walked this universe for centuries untold, he has seen stars fall to dust. You might as well flirt with a mountain range!
CLARA: I did not flirt with him.
VASTRA: He flirted with you.
CLARA: How?
VASTRA: He looked young! Who do you think that was for?
CLARA: … me?
VASTRA: Everyone. I wear a veil as he wore a face, for the same reason.
CLARA: What reason?
VASTRA: The oldest reason there is for anything: To be accepted.

"Many have interpreted the scene as something of a ‘take-down’ aimed at fans perceived only to be into the show for an attractive young lead (a ‘judgement on the quality of their hearts’, as Vastra says - a ridiculous notion in and of itself, but that’s for another day), but if anything it’s about Doctor Who itself. Vastra notes that The Doctor wasn’t just appearing young for his companions, it was for everyone - even the audience itself. The character and the show wanted to be accepted, either in-fiction by his traveling associates but also in the real world, by a new generation of viewers. He had to hide his age, his quirks and his weirdness, as did the series - until now, where he can cast off his facade and show who he really is to both Clara and the audience.
But it’s in Clara’s, and therefore in this analogy, the audience’s furious retort, that its made clear:”
I am not sure who you think you are talking to right now, Madame Vastra, but I have never had the slightest interest in pretty young men - and for the record, if there was anybody who could flirt with a mountain range, she’s probably standing in front of you right now!
Just because my pretty face has turned your head, do not assume that I am so easily distracted.

"If Vastra’s speech is a supposed ‘screw you’ to people unwilling to accept an older, weirder Doctor for who he is, Clara and the audience are replying with ‘Well screw you for thinking we’d act like that’. It symbolises both the shows willingness to get a bit more bizarre, and the audience’s willingness to accept and enjoy that. I think we all had a bit of Jenny in us after Clara got that one out, and engaged in some damn fine clapping."
From “We are entering an era of acceptance for ‘weird’ pop culture” by James Whitbrook

VASTRA: But he is The Doctor. He has walked this universe for centuries untold, he has seen stars fall to dust. You might as well flirt with a mountain range!

CLARA: I did not flirt with him.

VASTRA: He flirted with you.

CLARA: How?

VASTRA: He looked young! Who do you think that was for?

CLARA: … me?

VASTRA: Everyone. I wear a veil as he wore a face, for the same reason.

CLARA: What reason?

VASTRA: The oldest reason there is for anything: To be accepted.

"Many have interpreted the scene as something of a ‘take-down’ aimed at fans perceived only to be into the show for an attractive young lead (a ‘judgement on the quality of their hearts’, as Vastra says - a ridiculous notion in and of itself, but that’s for another day), but if anything it’s about Doctor Who itself. Vastra notes that The Doctor wasn’t just appearing young for his companions, it was for everyone - even the audience itself. The character and the show wanted to be accepted, either in-fiction by his traveling associates but also in the real world, by a new generation of viewers. He had to hide his age, his quirks and his weirdness, as did the series - until now, where he can cast off his facade and show who he really is to both Clara and the audience.

But it’s in Clara’s, and therefore in this analogy, the audience’s furious retort, that its made clear:”


I am not sure who you think you are talking to right now, Madame Vastra, but I have never had the slightest interest in pretty young men - and for the record, if there was anybody who could flirt with a mountain range, she’s probably standing in front of you right now!

Just because my pretty face has turned your head, do not assume that I am so easily distracted.

"If Vastra’s speech is a supposed ‘screw you’ to people unwilling to accept an older, weirder Doctor for who he is, Clara and the audience are replying with ‘Well screw you for thinking we’d act like that’. It symbolises both the shows willingness to get a bit more bizarre, and the audience’s willingness to accept and enjoy that. I think we all had a bit of Jenny in us after Clara got that one out, and engaged in some damn fine clapping."

From We are entering an era of acceptance for ‘weird’ pop culture by James Whitbrook

What is truth?” - John 18:38

Love rejoices in the truth, but not in evil. - 1 Cor 13:6

 Do you want to be counted wise, to build a reputation for wisdom? Here’s what you do: Live well, live wisely, live humbly. It’s the way you live, not the way you talk, that counts. Mean-spirited ambition isn’t wisdom. Boasting that you are wise isn’t wisdom. Twisting the truth to make yourselves sound wise isn’t wisdom. It’s the furthest thing from wisdom—it’s animal cunning, devilish conniving. Whenever you’re trying to look better than others or get the better of others, things fall apart and everyone ends up at the others’ throats. - James 3:13-16

  I know that good doesn’t live in me—that is, in my body. The desire to do good is inside of me, but I can’t do it. I don’t do the good that I want to do, but I do the evil that I don’t want to do. But if I do the very thing that I don’t want to do, then I’m not the one doing it anymore. Instead, it is sin that lives in me that is doing it.

 So I find that, as a rule, when I want to do what is good, evil is right there with me.

Romans 7:18-21 Common English Bible

WORDS AND PHRASES FROM “INTO THE DALEK”



1. Metaphor - A very descriptive and apt word for this season and probably every episode in this season


2. expand consciousness - new ways to see reality


3. star, born again - renewal, a complete rebirth is necessary to be a star in the universe


4. suggestible to new ideas - receptive to those things that can make you better (a humble disciple)


5. save your soul - giving you new spiritual reasons for your life


6. imagine if - learn to visualize, see the possibilities


7. saw the truth - had an epiphany - an experience of sudden and striking realization


8. What is the truth? - how can you tell? Whom do you trust to tell you?


9. opened mind - not closed to new ideas, willingness to ponder


10. endless divine perfection - eternal completeness (morally) and correctness (scientific) as revealed in God’s laws


11. feel it - live by it - It must reside in your heart for it to change you

"Clara sees something the Doctor doesn’t. What they have learned is that a good Dalek is possible. The Doctor then sets about trying to reawaken the memories that had helped the Dalek learn good in the first place. The Doctor says hopefully that if he can turn one Dalek, he can turn them all, and save the future. The Doctor tells the Dalek (whom he has nicknamed “Rusty”) that he is going to save its soul – to which the Dalek responds that it doesn’t have one. The Doctor performs a sort of “mind meld” and lets the Dalek see inside his own soul, to see the universe as he sees it. And there, the Dalek sees the beauty of the universe – “endless divine perfection” and “divinity” – but also the Doctor’s hatred of the Daleks."
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"The episode is really about the possibility of redemption – not just for the Dalek, but for the Doctor, and for soldiers present and future. There is an interesting suggestion that, for all the genetic manipulation that makes Daleks evil, there is a need for something more evil still – a computerized supplement to the Dalek’s brain that takes that evil tendency and supplements and enhances it. And so there is some suggestion that even a Dalek may not be beyond redemption. And if so, that has a hopeful message for human beings, and a challenging one for those who view other humans who are their enemies as being pure evil, with no hope of redemption or possibility of change."
by James F. McGrath on Patheos.com - Exploring our Matrix - Progressive Christian Channel
Full article here: Doctor Who: Into The Dalek

"Clara sees something the Doctor doesn’t. What they have learned is that a good Dalek is possible. The Doctor then sets about trying to reawaken the memories that had helped the Dalek learn good in the first place. The Doctor says hopefully that if he can turn one Dalek, he can turn them all, and save the future. The Doctor tells the Dalek (whom he has nicknamed “Rusty”) that he is going to save its soul – to which the Dalek responds that it doesn’t have one. The Doctor performs a sort of “mind meld” and lets the Dalek see inside his own soul, to see the universe as he sees it. And there, the Dalek sees the beauty of the universe – “endless divine perfection” and “divinity” – but also the Doctor’s hatred of the Daleks."

*****************************

"The episode is really about the possibility of redemption – not just for the Dalek, but for the Doctor, and for soldiers present and future. There is an interesting suggestion that, for all the genetic manipulation that makes Daleks evil, there is a need for something more evil still – a computerized supplement to the Dalek’s brain that takes that evil tendency and supplements and enhances it. And so there is some suggestion that even a Dalek may not be beyond redemption. And if so, that has a hopeful message for human beings, and a challenging one for those who view other humans who are their enemies as being pure evil, with no hope of redemption or possibility of change."

by James F. McGrath on Patheos.com - Exploring our Matrix - Progressive Christian Channel

Full article here:
Doctor Who: Into The Dalek

The only water in the forest
Is the River running t’ward us

(Someone needs to put this song to video)

Excerpts from the article:

Doctor Who is, by a long shot, the saddest show on television. I mean “sad” like “melancholy,” sad like “tragic,” sad like “will leave you a blubbering mess on more than one occasion.”

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In the latest season premiere, the new Doctor had a line that seems to echo that assertion, where he told the latest monster that every person is important: “They’re never small to me.” And part of what makes Doctor Who such a relentlessly emotional experience is how it takes people so seriously–how the Doctor seems to focus simultaneously on the complete sweep of a person’s life, while zero-ing in on the few minutes he gets to spend with them. The show functions in the same way. At its best, the small moments feel weighted with macrocosmic importance, while the massive plot-arc moments feel intimate.

*****************

Maybe “sad” is the wrong word for Doctor Who: It’s a show that takes tremendous joy in simple human connection, even as the modern iteration constantly futzes with those connections. (It’s never clear if the Doctor likes his Companions, or loves them, or if he just needs them to be in love with him.) But it’s fascinating how a show that stars an immortal–a higher being whose life will never end–constantly circles back around to endings. Friends disappear, or die; a place you love disappears, replaced by something new; sometimes people forget about you, or you forget about them. Gradually, you become a different person.

If there’s any story that’s having a Star Wars Moment right now, I’d say it might be Doctor Who. That sounds weird to say about a fifty-year-old show that has arguably already transformed a generation. But it has finally transcended its UK origins, becoming popular beyond the Commonwealth. And a new generation of kids in non-British nations are growing up with the Doctor instead of Han Solo. They’d rather travel through time in a police box than hear about Jabba the Hutt.